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Tax Glossary

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  • Collection Statute of Limitation

    IRC Section 6503 places an express limit on the time in which the IRS may collect a tax. Normally, the Collection Statute is 10 years from the date of assessment, but can be extended under certain situations.

  • Community Property

    A state law that creates a community upon marriage and all property acquired during the marriage is held as community property, with both the husband and the wife having a one-half interest in the community assets. Hence, the IRS can serve a Notice of Levy for of the wifes salary for the husbands separate liability. **Community property states include: Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin.

  • Compliance

    All taxes are paid up to date and all returns required to file are filed to date. Therefore, if submitting an OIC, IA or status 53 for individuals request, the taxpayer must have all estimated tax payments paid to date and returns filed. If submitting an OIC or IA for a business, the taxpayer must have paid all taxes for the past two quarters and filed all returns.

  • Currently Non-Collectible

    Status 53 is also referred to as Currently Non-Collectible, Currently Uncollectible, or CNC. Status 53 allows taxpayers to make no monthly payments to their delinquent tax debt due to minimal income to provide for themselves and their family.
    Deductions
    An expense subtracted from adjusted gross income when calculating taxable income, such as for state and local taxes paid, charitable gifts, and certain types of interest payments or business expenses.
  • Default

    Failure to repay an outstanding debt as agreed.

  • Discharge of Federal Lien

    Authorized under the IRS Code. The process whereby the taxpayer or interested third party applies to have the federal tax lien removed from a specific piece of property or other asset. The discharge may be granted if:
    • IRS has no interest in the property,
    • IRS will receive the net proceeds from the sale of the asset, or
    • The taxpayer has equity in other assets equal to 3 times the amount of the tax liability.
  • Earned Income Tax Credit

    A tax credit given to qualified low-income wage earners, even if no income tax was withheld from the individuals pay.

  • Enrolled Agent

    An Enrolled Agent (EA) is a federally-authorized tax practitioner who has technical expertise in the field of taxation and who is empowered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to represent taxpayers before all administrative levels of the Internal Revenue Service for audits, collections, and appeals.
     
    What does the term Enrolled Agent mean?
    Enrolled means to be licensed to practice by the federal government, and Agent means authorized to appear in the place of the taxpayer at the IRS. Only Enrolled Agents, tax attorneys, and CPAs may represent taxpayers before the IRS. The Enrolled Agent profession dates back to 1884 when, after questionable claims had been presented for Civil War losses, Congress acted to regulate persons who represented citizens in their dealings.
     
    Enrolled Agent" (EA) is a tax professional who has passed an IRS test covering all aspects of taxation, plus passed an IRS background check. Enrolled Agents have passed a two-day, 8-hour examination. The examination (called the Special Enrollment Examination) covers all aspects of federal tax law, including the taxation of individuals, corporations, partnerships, and various regulations governing IRS collections and audit procedures. Like CPAs and tax attorneys, EAs can handle any type of tax matter and represent their client's interests before the IRS. Unlike CPAs and tax attorneys, Enrolled Agents are tested directly by the IRS, and enrolled agents focus exclusively on tax accounting. The "EA" designation may be revoked by the IRS' Office of Professional Responsibility for malpractice.
     
    How can Enrolled Agent help me?
    Enrolled Agents advise, represent, and prepare tax returns for individuals, partnerships, corporations, estates, trusts, and any entities with tax-reporting requirements. Enrolled Agents expertise in the continually changing field of taxation enables them to effectively represent taxpayers audited by the IRS.
     
    Privilege and the Enrolled Agent: The IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 allow federally authorized practitioners (those bound by the Department of Treasurys Circular 230 regulations) a limited client privilege. This privilege allows confidentiality between the taxpayer and the Enrolled Agent under certain conditions. The privilege applies to situations in which the taxpayer is being represented in cases involving audits and collection matters. It is not applicable to the preparation and filing of a tax return. This privilege does not apply to state tax matters, although a number of states have an accountant-client privilege with the U.S. Treasury Department.
  • Equitable Relief

    If a spouse does not qualify for innocent spouse relief or separation of liability, they may qualify for equitable relief. The taxpayer must show, under all facts and circumstances, that it would be unfair to be held liable for the understatement or underpayment of taxes. (U.S. Master Tax Guide 2004)

  • Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA)

    This is Social Security Tax. FICA consists of Social Security (supplemental retirement income) payroll tax and a Medicare (hospital insurance) tax. The tax is levied on employers, employees, and certain self-employed individuals. On some pay stubs it may be listed as some form of Old Age Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI).

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